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Join the Fun at ‘What the Tech?’

What the Tech 2017

It’s back! The ever popular “What the Tech is That?” session is on the schedule for the Aug. 10-11 Wyoming Library Association conference in Sheridan. You can help make it a great time for all, especially yourself, by taking the stage as one of the session contributors.

“What the Tech?” is a rapid-fire, whirlwind tour of websites and tech tools. Contributors can have fun exploring new gadgets and gizmos, choosing and preparing a handful of topics, and trying to share each one in the 90 (or so) seconds before the bell signals the end of the round.

If you haven’t seen a WTT session and would like a better idea of what’s involved, find examples of previous year’s handouts and slides on the WLA New Tech Interest Group wiki. Also enjoy the video of last year’s hybrid conference presentation below.

Interested? Contact Thomas Ivie at thomas.ivie@wyo.gov, (307) 777-6330, or Paige Bredenkamp at paige.bredenkamp@wyo.gov, (307) 777-6331, for more details.

 

 

WLA Announces Conference Speakers

Garth Stein

The Wyoming Library Association has secured two top-notch speakers for the 2017 WLA conference August 10-11 in Sheridan.

The keynote speaker at the Thursday, August 10, kick-off luncheon, will be Stephen Hughes on “Influence: The Art & Science of Changing Minds.” This exciting program draws on the latest scientific research to illustrate how you can influence others to see things your way without resorting to manipulation. You’ll leave with practical ideas you can apply right away.

Garth Stein will be featured at the author luncheon on Friday, August 11. Stein writes for all ages. His newest novel is A Sudden Light, published by Simon and Schuster in September, 2014.  He has three previous novels:  Raven Stole the MoonHow Evan Broke His Head and Other Secretsand The Art of Racing in the Rain  and has authored the Enzo children’s series. (Enzo, Zoë, and Denny are actually characters from The Art of Racing in the Rain.) 

School librarians, don’t forget: Information Power will be held as a pre-conference on August 9.

Register to attend on the WLA website.

Tentative Conference Schedule:

Wednesday, August 9

  • 10 a.m.: Information Power

Thursday, August 10

  • 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.: Registration and vendors open
  • 12-1:15 p.m.: Keynote speaker Stephen Hughes on “Influence: The Art & Science of Changing Minds”
  • 1:15-1:45 p.m.: WLA Annual Meeting
  • 2-3 p.m.: Breakout sessions
  • 3-3:45 p.m.: Break and vendor time
  • 3:45-4:30 p.m. Breakouts sessions
  • 4:30-5:30: Happy hour and awards celebration at Sheridan Kooi Library

Friday, August 11

  • 8-9 a.m.: Breakfast with vendors
  • 9-9:50 a.m.: Breakout sessions
  • 10-10:30 a.m.: Vendor time and basket raffle drawing
  • 10:45-11:45 a.m.: Breakout sessions
  • 12-1:30 p.m.: Lunch with author Garth Stein
  • 1:30-2 p.m.: Interest group meetings

GoWYLD for the Great Outdoors

Lake Marie, Snowy Range

June is Great Outdoors Month, a perfect time to enjoy all the beauty Wyoming has to offer. Wyoming libraries can help you make the most of it with free, online resources in GoWYLD.net. Check out these resources for inspiration:

  • Zinio Digital Magazines has a great selection of outdoor titles, including Backcountry, Backpacker, Canoe & KayakField & Stream, National Geographic Traveler, and Outside.
  • Total Boox (ebooks) has an extensive Travel section. Find guides to National Parks or Route 66 and other road trips — not to mention all the hidden gems in Wyoming. Get out and explore!
  • Wyoming Places gives you the scoop on historical and current information for everything from ghost towns and Pony Express stations to the thriving Equality State communities of today.
  • Bookflix lets you enjoy a video storybook as you explore nature with children. Watch their eyes light up with titles such as In the Small, Small PondBugs, Bugs, Bugs!; and Rosie’s Walk.
Log into these fantastic GoWYLD.net resources any time, anywhere, with a Wyoming public, community college, or university library card and PIN. Questions? Find help and tutorials on the site, or contact your local library for assistance.

Fundraising Tasks During the Summer Doldrums

Summer may be a quiet time in the world of fundraising. But that doesn’t mean your library’s Foundation or Friends groups can’t stay busy and make the most of the warmer months. CauseVox offers these six suggestions for ways to keep your fundraising rolling:

  1. Create a fundraising plan
  2. Conduct prospect research
  3. Start planning for year-end fundraising efforts (it’s not too early!)
  4. Prepare for your annual report by gathering stories and photos
  5. Host a simple fundraising event
  6. Conduct a marketing audit

Read the full article for details and ideas on each of these six tasks.

June 2017 Outrider Now Available

Find a wrap-up of the latest in Wyoming library news in the June 2017 Outrider newsletter from the Wyoming State Library. Subscribe today, and we’ll send the Outrider straight to your email inbox each month.

Have news you’d like included? Contact Susan Mark, WSL publications specialist, at susan.mark@wyo.gov or (307) 777-5915. Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook and Twitter, too.

Supporting College and Career Readiness in Small Libraries

YALSA, in partnership with the Association for Rural and Small Libraries (ARSL), is implementing an innovative project that will build the capacity of small, rural and tribal libraries to provide college and career readiness (CCR) services for and with middle schoolers. The project is aimed at library staff in libraries with a service population of 15,000 or fewer, as well as libraries that are 25 miles or more from an urbanized area.

Library staff may apply to be a part of a cohort of learners who will be supported by coaches and mentors, and work together to develop CCR services and resources. Cohort members will meet and work both in-person and online.

Future Ready with the Library Goals

  • Library staff at rural, small, and tribal libraries will learn effective methods for planning and implementing , with a local partner, CCR initiatives for and with middle schoolers and their families
  • Middle schoolers and their families in rural, small, and tribal communities will gain valuable future ready information that will better prepare them for starting a career and/or focusing on academics related to a career after high school
  • Middle schoolers in rural, small, and tribal libraries will engage in valuable career exploration and workforce preparation experiences
  • Library staff in small, rural, and tribal libraries around the U.S. will develop a set of model programs and tools that can be used by a wide range of communities and libraries.

Schedule for Cohort 2 application process:

  • The application for cohort 2 is now open
  • July 13, 2017 at 5 p.m. MDT informational webinar for potential applicants — reserve a seat online
  • September 1, 2017, cohort 2 application period closes
  • October 15, 2017, cohort 2 application status notifications made

Those selected to participate in the second cohort of the Future Ready with the Library project will meet face-to-face for a two day orientation just before the ALA Midwinter meeting in Denver, Colorado.  For more information about the project, check out our FAQ.

You can see the list of Cohort 1 participants and read about their work on the YALSAblog.

Use this quick online form to sign up to receive email notifications about the project, including an announcement when the next round of applications opens.  To access an existing compilation of college and career readiness resources, visit YALSA’s wiki.

This project is funded by the Institute of Museum & Library Services.  For more information, read the full grant proposal (.pdf) or the press release.

Professional Development for your Board(s)

Reposted with permission from Library Strategies

Public libraries often have a number of boards, including a Library Board, as well as a Foundation or Friends Board. As professional bodies that can affect the performance of your library, it is important that each member of the board regularly participates in professional development activities. In this way, the board members become informed leaders, such that their work improves the Library and advances the work of the expert, professional staff.

Here a few ways to help your board in their annual professional development:

Key 1: Board orientation – Hold a board orientation for all new members that covers their roles and responsibilities, as well as the basic services of the library. A board orientation is also valuable as a refresher for long-time board members, and requiring attendance once every three years can help members stay on track.

Key 2: Define annual activities – All board members should engage in some aspect of professional development each year. The topics may be library-related, or how to run an effective board, or on broader trends, such as publishing or the digital world. Conferences, webinars, and state and national organizations today offer a wealth of opportunities for board training and advancement. Help your board by offering a smorgasbord of opportunities each year, with regular reminders to participate.

Key 3: Board evaluation – Have an annual board evaluation process, which can be as simple as the board president sending out an annual comment sheet to each member asking what is working well or not on the board, and what they would like to see changed. By annually evaluating the board, you can help discover board weaknesses that might effectively be addressed through training or support.

Some additional ideas for professional development activities for your boards include regular presentations by professional staff on library trends; using former board members as mentors to new board members; and thinking outside the library to explore issues in publishing, technology, finance, change management, fundraising, social media, governance, etc.

In board professional development, it is important that board members fundamentally understand and embrace their defined roles and responsibilities. But for an energized board, it is equally important that they participate in interesting, social, and other engaging activities that help them support the library and plan for its future.

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Also check out the Wyoming State Library’s Library Board Members’ Handbook.

‘What in the World’ at Centennial Library

From UW News

Jean Garrison

University of Wyoming students and faculty members will give three presentations, free and open to the public, during the fifth annual “What in the World?” summer program at the Albany County Public Library Centennial branch. All sessions, moderated by Jean Garrison, UW Center for Global Studies (CGS) director, highlight the work that recent UW graduates completed for their international research projects and the innovative research of UW-affiliated faculty.

The summer CGS schedule is:

  • Wednesday June 14, at 5:30 p.m., Centennial Fellow presentations: Ashkia Campbell, zoology and physiology senior, from Casper, “Nest Predation in Ecuador”; and Jeremy Goldsmith, international studies, and environment and natural resources master’s degree candidate, from Louisville, Ky., “How and Why Gambians Migrate.”
  • Wednesday, July 12, at 5:30 p.m., faculty research presentation: Mark Ritchie and Lena Hardy, both Department of Art and Art History professors, “Riding the Range in Mongolia and Australia: Art, Insights and Impressions.”
  • Wednesday, Aug. 30, 5:30 p.m., faculty research presentation: Thomas Risse, Department of Political Science, Free University of Berlin, “Europe, the U.S. and the Transatlantic Relationship during Tumultuous Times.”

The series is made possible by the Ruth R. Ellbogen Foundation and the CGS’s UW partners. For more information about CGS, call Garrison at (307) 766-6119, email garrison@uwyo.edu, or visit www.uwyo.edu/globalcenter.

Military News in Wyoming Newspapers

Wyoming Newspapers now includes 1944-45 issues of the Fort Warren Sentinel:  “A weekly newspaper published by and for the military personnel of Ft. Warren, Wyoming.” In the first issue on February 11, 1944, Hollywood stars such as Jimmy Durante, Mickey Rooney, Abbott and Costello, and Bing Crosby wished the fledgling paper well.

The Sentinel is one of several military newspapers the Wyoming State Library makes available online. We also expect to add German POW newsletters from Camp Douglas and Fort Francis E. Warren in the near future. (Watch this blog for the announcement!)

Currently, Wyoming Newspapers includes:

The Wyoming State Library added the Fort Warren Sentinel recently with the help of the Wyoming State Archives whose archivists found a set of old single issues in their stacks and digitized the paper copies so the images could be added.

So this Memorial Day, enjoy these glimpses into Wyoming’s military history in Wyoming Newspapers.

 

Wyoming Libraries See 3.5 Million Visits in FY16

Happiness at Niobrara County Library! Wyoming’s 23 public libraries held more than 11,500 children’s programs in FY16.

Libraries are vital to Wyoming residents — and we have the numbers to prove it. The Wyoming State Library has just released FY16 public library data on its Wyoming Library Statistics page for the period from July 1, 2015, through June 30, 2016. A summary report, county rankings, and 5-year trends are available.

Among the report highlights:

  • There were 3.53 million visits to public libraries in FY16 – 6 visits for every Wyoming resident.
  • Public libraries were open for a combined total of 142,508 hours annually (almost 1,000 more hours than in FY15)..
  • Circulation dropped slightly to just over 4.54 million, 7.8 items per capita (from 4.93 million and 8.4 items per capita in FY15).
  • Public libraries held 2.7 million books and audio-visual materials in their collections, a decrease from FY15.
  • All Wyoming public libraries offer free Wi-Fi. The 14 libraries that were able to provide this data reported, collectively, 237,321 Wi-Fi sessions in FY16 (37.5% increase over FY15.
  • Public libraries employed 648 people for a total of 385.2 full-time equivalent positions.

Although these statistics allow for comparisons among libraries, caution should be exercised when interpreting them. Local needs, economies, geography and library policies differ, and that can be reflected in the numbers.

Questions about library statistics? Contact Thomas Ivie, WSL Research & Statistics Librarian at thomas.ivie@wyo.gov or (307) 777-6330.