Category Archives: Training

RIPL Data Boot Camp Webinar Series



BOOT CAMP stamp in red

From Library Research Service

Is one of your new year’s resolutions to get your library’s data in shape? Then, spend the winter with the Research Institute for Public Libraries (RIPL) and participate in our Data Boot Camp Series! This free webinar series features curriculum from the RIPL 2020 national event. These will NOT be webinars where you listen to a talking head the whole time; instead, please come ready to participate in a variety of interactive learning activities, some of which will occur in small groups in breakout rooms.

Here is the schedule – go to ripl.lrs.org/ripl-data-boot-camp/ to learn more about each webinar and register:

  • January 27 (11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. MST): Observations: Data Hiding in Plain Sight
  • February 2 (11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. MST): Can You Hear Me Now? Communicating Data to Stakeholders
  • February 23 (11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. MST): Nothing for Us, Without Us: Getting Started with Culturally Responsive Evaluation
  • March 2 (12-1:30 p.m. MST): Meaningful Metrics for Your Organization
  • March 16 (12-1:30 p.m. MST): Evaluation + Culture = Change

All webinars will be recorded.

Applications Open for ARSL Leadership Institute



Outstanding in Their Field logoFrom the Texas State Library and Archives Commission

The Association for Rural & Small Libraries (ARSL) has announced the Outstanding in Their Field Leadership Institute. The Institute is for library workers who are currently working in rural and/or small libraries from various backgrounds and ethnicities.

Applications are due February 24.

ARSL encourages applications from folks who may not have a Master of Library and Information Science degree; those without a college degree are also encouraged to apply. If you are committed to serving your community through librarianship, but your library has very limited funds for professional development or attendance at conferences or if you’re a library lifer with or without a library degree and you want to up your library game – this Institute is for you. All participant travel, materials, and instructional expenses (worth approximately $8,000) are covered by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

Online Training ‘At Your Leisure’



In addition to the live webinars in our training calendar, each month we try to pick some videos out there that you can watch “At Your Leisure.” These on-demand offerings caught our attention for January:

Intro to Podcasting (Podcasting 101, Part 1) (Wyoming State Library)
View slides
What’s a podcast and why should I have one? Learn about how to start your own podcast for your museum or library and find a whole new audience outside your walls for your programs and collections. Cameron Green, technical producer of the Cheyenne Frontier Days Old West Museum’s “Saddle Lore,” will discuss the basic technology needs for starting and web hosting your podcast. Skye Cranney, cohost of the Idaho State Historical Society’s “Behind Gray Walls,” will discuss how to build consistent content. Learn about budget, technology, production, and more in this informative session, the first of a two-part series.


Thinking about Race, Voting Rights, and the Past: People, Moments, and Documents (Federal Depository Library Program)
“Research is like archaeology” – Prof. Fuentes-Rohwer has done research in many libraries and archives (the Library of Congress, presidential libraries, the Dirksen Congressional Center, and academic libraries) for the book that he is completing on race and voting in the United States. Central to the story of the book are the Voting Rights Act and the Freedom Movement. Prof. Fuentes Rohwer will talk about his research, sharing stories about historical figures in the Freedom Movement and his research uncovering Government documents that are central to his work. Ms. Morgan will provide information on historical and archival resources used for researching U.S. Congressional documents, judicial case records, and archival collections.


Building a Fundable Strategic Plan (EveryLibrary Institute)
EveryLibrary’s executive director John Chrastka will share actionable insights from nearly 100 library funding campaigns about inclusive planning, and uncover what data drives successful strategic plans to build political and social support for funding libraries.


Personal Planning for Professional Development (Montana State Library)
Training is important in any job but especially in libraries because libraries are always moving on the cutting edge of transformations. Libraries react endlessly to technology changes, social needs, community interests, political climates and (as we have recently discovered) local, national and global crises. As the Montana State Library launches the new Strategic Track to support veteran library staff, this session will help library directors and those who are looking to advance their careers in librarianship to understand the direct relationship between the training you choose, the work you do, and the success of your library’s programs and services. The new Strategic Track for MT State Library Certification supports a model for planning training that is customized to the needs of the learner and the library where they work.

Media Literacy for Adults Guide and Webinars



Cover image of Media Literacy in the Library documentFrom the American Library Association

Imagine that you are working at the reference desk when a patron comes to you with a question. They cite a “fact” that has been widely debunked, mentioning an article from a publication that you know to be untrustworthy. What can you, as a library worker, do to educate and inform them?

In response to the need for media literacy education, the American Library Association (ALA) has released a free digital guide and related webinar series to help library workers plan for moments like these.

The guide

Media Literacy in the Library: A Guide for Library Practitioners” contains information, program ideas and conversation starters on topics like misinformation and disinformation; architecture of the internet; civics; media landscape and economics; and media creation and engagement. The 30-page guide also explores ways to “meet patrons where they are” by integrating media literacy into reference interactions and existing programs.

In the guide, library workers may explore:

  • Concepts such as filter bubbles, confirmation bias, and news deserts
  • How to answer questions about false or misleading news items in reference interactions
  • Virtual and in-person program ideas covering topics like fact checking, cookies, internet privacy, the Freedom of Information Act and local media
  • Ideas for discussing the corporate media landscape through a reading of “The Hunger Games” trilogy by Suzanne Collins
  • Tips and resources for measuring program outcomes

Training webinars

A series of one-hour webinars will explore these concepts from the guide. The webinars are free for all library workers, though space is limited. Register for the live sessions at the links below; all sessions will be recorded and available within 24 hours on ALA’s Programming Librarian website.

The materials were created for out-of-school adult audiences, who library workers will generally meet in a public library context. However, many of the approaches and best practices explored are appropriate for a classroom or other library setting.

Diversity Training for Wyoming Librarians



Selfie of Suzanne Reymer with tulips in the background. She's wearing a light blue shirt and glasses and has short, brown, curly hair.
Suzanne Reymer

What does “equitable services” mean in libraries, and what does it look like? How can we ensure that those in underserved groups have a voice and feel included? To explore these issues, Wyoming library workers and trustees in all types of libraries are invited to attend an online training in January, “We’re All in This Together: Serving the Whole Community.”

This hour-long session with Suzanne Reymer, Statewide Consulting Librarian for the Montana State Library, will introduce community engagement concepts using Census data and focus on how libraries can be windows to the world. The training will be offered three times:

  • 10-11 a.m. MST on Tuesday, January 12, 2021
  • 1-2 p.m. MST on Thursday, January 21, 2021
  • 1-2 p.m. MST on Wednesday, January 27, 2021

Register here. Registration closes Friday, January 8, 2021. These sessions are designed to be attended live and will NOT be recorded.

Why attend? This training will enable you to scan your community and identify who is not being fully served. You’ll learn to consider all community members and even the historical nature of the community when developing and designing library services and gain the skills and information to seek out feedback from underserved and changing community groups.

Suzanne provides consulting and advisory services to public librarians and trustees as well as support for e-rate, bandwidth, public computing centers and digital literacy. Serving and welcoming everyone in the community has been a passion of hers for many years.

Learn more about the training and about the full grant project. Questions may be directed to Brian Greene at brian.greene@wyo.gov or (307) 777-6339.

This project is made possible in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services through the Laura Bush, Community Catalyst Grant number RE-246273-OLS-20. Arizona, Idaho, Montana, North and South Dakota, and Wyoming are participating in this project.

Dealing with Angry Patrons



Young woman with long dark hair and angry expression in pink sweater against an orange wall.During the pandemic, tensions have been running high. Library workers can find themselves facing patrons who are angry not just over the usual issues, but over masks and reduced access and services. How do you defuse the situation?

WebJunction has free, online training that can help. Their self-paced course, Dealing with Angry Patrons, will teach you how to minimize conflict, defuse patron anger, and identify the underlying issues. It outlines a two-step method for responding to anger by first dealing with the patron’s feelings and then their problem. The course includes practice with realistic patron encounters.

WebJunction is a great resource for online training. Find all their offerings in their course catalog.

Online Training ‘At Your Leisure’



In addition to the live webinars in our training calendar, each month we try to pick some videos out there that you can watch “At Your Leisure.” These on-demand offerings caught our attention for December:

Chilton Library (Gale)
For the automotive “do-it-yourselfer.” Repair, maintenance and specification tables provide critical data on thousands of domestic and imported models of cars and light trucks. This webinar covers how to select a year, make, and model, and navigate repair, maintenance, and recall information.


CopyTalk Webinar Archive (American Library Association)
CopyTalk is a series of webinars on specific copyright topics that include orphan works, mass digitization, international copyright developments, pending and recent copyright court cases, the copyright implications of new technologies, and more.


2017 Virtual Genealogy Fair: Taking Care of your Family Heirlooms (U.S. National Archives)
This session will cover the basic ideas of properly storing and handling family heirlooms. Katie Smith will discuss books, paper, photographs, and a little bit about textiles and other family heirlooms. In particular, she will discuss appropriate storage containers, where to put them in your home, how to handle them properly, and important tips about digitizing what you have.


Culturally Responsive STEAM Programming: Engaging Latinx Communities in Rural Areas (STARnet)
Webinar participants will learn about the importance of culturally responsive programming. You will also meet the STEAM Equity project librarian advisors, who will provide programming ideas and outreach strategies you can use to build relationships with Latinx communities in your area starting right now.


Closing the Gender Gap: Developing Gender Equitable STEAM Programs (STARnet)
Are you interested in making your library programs more equitable, where all patrons can “see themselves” in your STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math) activities? STAR Net is teaming up with the Emmy-award winning PBS SciGirls to explore the importance of gender equitable programs where all patrons can develop positive STEAM identities. Be part of the change in closing the gender gap by offering empowering programs and activities that strengthen girls’ interest and confidence in STEAM, and learn strategies that use the latest research in engaging all patrons in science learning.

Online Training ‘At Your Leisure’



In addition to the live webinars in our training calendar, each month we try to pick some videos out there that you can watch “At Your Leisure.” These on-demand offerings caught our attention for November:

Intro to Podcasting (Podcasting 101, Part 1) (Wyoming State Library)
Learn about how to start your own podcast for your museum or library and find a whole new audience outside your walls for your programs and collections. Cameron Green, technical producer of the Cheyenne Frontier Days Old West Museum’s “Saddle Lore,” will discuss the basic technology needs for starting and web hosting your podcast. Skye Cranney, cohost of the Idaho State Historical Society’s “Behind Gray Walls,” will discuss how to build consistent content. Learn about budget, technology, production, and more in this informative session, the first of a two-part series.


Programming for Adults with Developmental Disabilities: Why and How (Infopeople)
Would you like to offer programming for adults with developmental disabilities rather than just a place to visit? Join us for this one-hour webinar devoted to an exploration of a range of topics related to programming in your libraries for the adults with developmental disabilities in your community.

 

Why I Have Coffee with People Who Send Me Hate Mail (TED Talk): Özlem Cekic’s email inbox has been full of hate mail since 2007, when she won a seat in the Danish Parliament — becoming the first female Muslim to do so. At first she just deleted the emails, dismissing them as the work of fanatics, until one day a friend made an unexpected suggestion: to reach out to the hate mail writers and invite them to meet for coffee. Hundreds of “dialogue coffee” meetings later, Cekic shares how face-to-face conversation can be one of the most powerful forces to disarm hate — and challenges us all to engage with people we disagree with. 15 minutes.


Helping Students Succeed During COVID-19 (Infopeople): This webinar will examine how public libraries across the country are helping students, their parents, and teachers succeed in the new world of distance learning. We will look at popular educational websites and reading resources as well as examples of videos designed to help Spanish-language speakers access the library’s resources. We will also discuss how one library continues to provide class visits during stay-at-home and will learn about “pandemic pods.” We will even share how some libraries are helping families deal with food insecurity due to school closures.


A Roadmap to Research with CQ Researcher (SAGE): Learn to use CQ Researcher.

Online Conferences in November



Each month we post upcoming free virtual conferences to our training calendar page. Here the the offerings coming up for November:

November 5
LibraryCon Live! 2020 (Library Journal and School Library Journal)
Join Library Journal and School Library Journal for our fourth annual LibraryCon Live! We’re excited to offer a day-long celebration of fandom-beloved stories and characters, featuring the creators behind mind-bending speculative fiction, innovative comics, and fan-favorite graphic novels. For more information and to register, visit: https://www.libraryjournal.com/?event=librarycon-2020

November 9-10
Virtual DLF Forum
The DLF Forum welcomes digital library, archives, and museum practitioners from member institutions and beyond—for whom it serves as a meeting place, marketplace, and congress. Registration deadline is Nov 1.

November 12
Digital Preservation Conference
Digital Preservation (DigiPres) is the annual conference for the National Digital Stewardship Alliance (NDSA). To register, visit: https://ndsa.org//conference/

November 13
5 for 5: Conversations on Five Years of Digitizing Hidden Collections (CLIR)
Join us online for a day of curated programming.

November 18
Design Institute 2020 (Library Journal)
Join Library Journal for Library Design Online, a reimagination of our long-running, in-person Design Institute program. Whether you’re looking to revamp your space as we continue to deal with COVID-19, or plan for future building/design projects, you’ll find ideas, information, and inspiration—no matter your budget!

November 19
Leading Big in Small Spaces: Free Online Conference for Small Libraries

Online Training ‘At Your Leisure’



In addition to the live webinars in our training calendar, each month we try to pick some videos out there that you can watch “At Your Leisure.” These on-demand offerings caught our attention for October:

NoveList (Wyoming State Library)
Staying in the know about new and popular books. Make sure your staff (and patrons) can keep up to date with the latest buzzworthy books! In this session, we’ll explore the NoveList resources like media mentions, search alerts, and more that will help you make the most out of NoveList. Find NoveList in our Recommended Reading on GoWYLD.net — accessible with a library card and PIN.


Open for the Future: School Librarians as Planners and Preppers (Every Library Institute)
School librarians can begin planning now for a changed role within the new normal of schools. Let’s look at reasonable scenarios and plan together for the success of school librarians in any future.


Homelessness in Small and Rural Communities: Libraries Can Help! (WebJunction)
This webinar offers practical insights on services and resources you can provide for people without stable housing. You’ll also learn how to create a welcoming environment, and how to engage your community in conversations and myth-debunking about homelessness.


2019 Virtual Genealogy Fair Session 2: Preserving Personal Collections (U.S. National Archives)
Personal collections are valued for their importance to understanding family history. Do you know how to best preserve your treasured papers and heirlooms so they can be passed on? This session will provide tips and information on the care and storage of paper, books, photographs, as well as film, audio, and video. Providing the best environment and storage will allow family heirlooms to be available for generations, while understanding proper handling and copying can expand their availability and enjoyment with distant kin.


Leading with Gratitude – Part 1 (SirsiDynix). Join SirsiDynix Chief Marketing Officer Eric Keith as he explores how to use gratitude as a method of engaging the hearts and minds of your employees and inspiring excellent work. Based on the book Leading with Gratitude by Adrian Gostick and Chester Elton, this webinar will offer effective communication skills that you can begin implementing today.