Category Archives: WSL News

January 2020 Outrider Now Available



Find a wrap-up of the latest in Wyoming library news in the January 2020 Outrider newsletter from the Wyoming State Library. Subscribe today, and we’ll send the Outrider straight to your email inbox each month. You can also see past issues.

Do you know any library colleagues, trustees, advocates, or volunteers who might be interested in the Outrider? Please share the news with them and encourage them to sign up for our monthly email.

Have news you’d like included? Contact Susan Mark, WSL Outreach Librarian, at susan.mark@wyo.gov or (307) 777-5915. Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook and Twitter, too.

WSL Closed for MLK/Equality Day



The Martin Luther King Jr Memorial in Washington DC

The Wyoming State Library will be closed Monday, January 20, for Martin Luther King Jr./Equality Day. We will be open our normal hours again on Tuesday, January 21.

From our Wyoming Legislation database, we find that in  1990, the Wyoming State Legislature designated the third Monday in January as a legal holiday, “Martin Luther King, Jr., Wyoming Equality Day.” (1990 Session Laws, Chapter 21)

Noted civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. was born on January 15, 1929. The Library of Congress has many digitized primary source materials on King in “Today in History – January 15.”

Wyoming Library History Online



Among the documents in our Wyoming State Publications database is a treasure trove of information about the history of the state’s libraries with digitized copies of the Wyoming Library Roundup and The Outrider. going back to the beginnings of each publication.

The Roundup was first published in September of 1942 by the Wyoming State Library Association, “mimeographed and distributed” by the Wyoming State Library. That first issue reflected the library concerns of the time with articles on “LIBRARIES AND THE WAR” and “VICTORY BOOK CAMPAIGN.”

Intended as a quarterly, it was published twice that year, then not again until 1946. In the old issues of the Roundup, you can find proceedings of the WSLA (now WLA) conferences, library statistics, news from around the state (including favorite book picks), and more.

In 1990, the Roundup ended publication after 48 years of informing the Wyoming library community. It was revived in 2004 as a joint publication of the Wyoming State Library and Wyoming Library Association on a (mostly) quarterly basis until 2015, when it was again discontinued.

The Outrider launched in January of 1969 as a publication of the Wyoming State Library, and it’s another good source of the state’s library history. The Outrider was published until 2011, when the State Library moved to a blog format. In 2016, with the retirement of the Roundup, the State Library decided to bring back The Outrider as a monthly email newsletter with items excerpted from the blog.

The WSL’s Marketing and Publications Team is responsible for The Outrider, which goes out monthly to nearly a thousand subscribers. (Sign up here if you’re not receiving it!) We welcome submissions and story ideas from libraries around the state. Contact Susan Mark, WSL Outreach Librarian, at susan.mark@wyo.gov or (307) 777-5915 if you have news you’d like included.

Who Counts in the Census? Everyone!



One of the most common questions to prepare for during the census is, “Who do I count?” If there is a human being living in your house for the majority of the time, you count them in your household. Grandparents, children, friends, siblings, cousins, spouses, significant others — count them all!

A common misconception about the census is to only count the blood-relatives living in a household, or to only count the permanent residents, but if a human being is living in a house as of Census Day on April 1, 2020, and has no other home where they spend more time, they need to be counted at that address regardless of familial relations.

Children are one of the most difficult complete counts to achieve each census. Some people don’t realize the responsibility is up to them. They might think their children’s schools are in charge of taking a count, or it might not occur to them that the census isn’t “just for grown-ups.” Whatever the reason, it’s important to remind your library patrons to count the kids living in their household — infants, toddlers, tweens, and teens — just as they also need to count every adult living in their household. Youth Services Librarians and School Librarians can find more resources to share with your patrons at our Wyoming State Library Census 2020 webpage.

Some groups have special circumstances for being counted, such as military members, inmates, long-term care patients, and off-at-college students, that make the average household count a little tricky. Luckily, the Census Bureau has a webpage especially for finding answers to these questions. Click here for more information.

Why does this simple, little question matter to your library? Every person counts, which means every community — big and small — counts, too! All our Wyoming communities count on accurate statistics and populations in order to provide appropriate funding and opportunities, including funding and opportunities for each and every library across the state. Did you know an average of $900,000 per year in recent federal funding for Wyoming libraries has been based on census numbers? More Wyoming residents counted means more funding for Wyoming libraries!

This year is the first census offers online completion, and patrons may be reaching out to their local library for internet and computer resources. Through training in your library, overall census awareness, and promotion in your community, we can help Wyoming achieve a Complete Count

Resources:

Deadline Near for Letters About Literature



Less than one week left! The postmark deadline to enter the Wyoming Letters About Literature Writing Contest (library.wyo.gov/letters) is coming up fast on Saturday, January 11, 2020. So if you or someone you know is working on an entry, now’s the time to finish it up and pop it in the mail.

Wyoming students in grades 4-12 can win Amazon gift cards of up to $150. Letters will be judged in three levels: grades 4-6, grades 7-8, and grades 9-12. Both classroom and individual entries are welcome.

Wyoming Letters About Literature is a project of the Wyoming State Library. Questions may be directed to Susan at susan.mark@wyo.gov or (307) 777-5915.

Planned Outage for WSL Website



The Wyoming State Library website will be down for maintenance most of the week of December 30 to January 3. There may be additional intermittent outages and minor glitches to clean up in subsequent weeks.

GoWYLD.netour catalog, and the Digital Collection Suite will not be affected by this outage. The directory may be accessed at this alternate link.

Also, the Wyoming State Library will be closed on Wednesday, January 1, for the New Year’s Day holiday. We will be open on New Year’s Eve, December 31.

December 2019 Outrider Now Available



Find a wrap-up of the latest in Wyoming library news in the December 2019 Outrider newsletter from the Wyoming State Library. Subscribe today, and we’ll send the Outrider straight to your email inbox each month. You can also see past issues.

Do you know any library colleagues, trustees, advocates, or volunteers who might be interested in the Outrider? Please share the news with them and encourage them to sign up for our monthly email.

Have news you’d like included? Contact Susan Mark, WSL Outreach Librarian, at susan.mark@wyo.gov or (307) 777-5915. Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook and Twitter, too.

One Month Left for Letters About Literature



The postmark deadline to enter the Wyoming Letters About Literature Writing Contest (library.wyo.gov/letters) is only one month away on January 11, 2020. Wyoming students in grades 4-12 can win Amazon gift cards of up to $150. Letters will be judged in three levels: grades 4-6, grades 7-8, and grades 9-12.

“To enter, read a book that inspires you or gives you a new way to see the world,” said Susan Mark, Wyoming State Library outreach librarian, “It can be one you’ve just picked up, or one you’ve read before. Then write a letter to the author – living or dead – to share how the book affected your life.”

Both classroom and individual entries are welcome. A teaching guide is available that provides activities and addresses how the program can dovetail with curriculum for teaching reading, and writing. Ready-to-print posters to promote the contest are available on the Wyoming State Library website at library.wyo.gov/letters.

Wyoming Letters About Literature is a project of the Wyoming State Library. Questions may be directed to Susan at susan.mark@wyo.gov or (307) 777-5915 or to Cary Dunlap at cary.dunlap1@wyo.gov or (307) 777-6338.