Workplace Resources for Mental Health Awareness Month



Mental Health Awareness Month. Poster with different people on green backgroundFrom the ALA-APA Library Worklife blog

May is Mental Health Awareness Month—a time to raise awareness around mental health challenges and prioritize mental health in the workplace. Mental health is always important, but with the lingering effects of the pandemic and a push to “return to normal,” it is at the top of the priority list.

Most people will experience a mental health challenge at some point. When the demands placed on a person exceed their resources and coping abilities, the strain could impact their mental health. For example, working long hours, caring for a relative, or experiencing economic hardship can contribute to poor mental health. Learning to cope with stress and situations that may lead to mental health concerns in a healthy way will help you become more resilient.

This article on the ALA-APA Library Worklife blog offers more information and numerous self-care tips for supporting mental health in the workplace. The list of resources below was also taken from the article.

Mental Health Resources

  • The American Psychiatric Association Foundation (APAF) Center for Workplace Mental Health developed a toolkit that offers tips and resources for supporting mental health and well-being at work for May and beyond. Topics include resiliency, self-care, isolation and loneliness, real strategies to show your support, and more.
  • The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is a national network of local crisis centers that provides free and confidential emotional support to people in suicidal crisis or emotional distress 24 hours a day, seven days a week in the United States.
  • The Mental Health.Gov site explains the basics of mental health, lists several early warning signs of possible mental health concerns, and offers suggestions to maintain positive mental health.
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) page on mental health offers many resources to help with understanding mental health, tips for coping with stress, and ways to get help.
  • Suicide Prevention LifeLine: 1-800-273-TALK (8255)
  • National Helpline: 1-800-662-HELP (4357)

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