Category Archives: GoWYLD

Resources for Health Literacy Month in GoWYLD



Graphic reads "October is Health Literacy Month"For more than 20 years, October has been recognized as Health Literacy Month. You can find more information about this celebration, including ideas to build awareness and take action, at www.healthliteracymonth.org.

According to that website, health literacy is “when individuals have the ability to find, understand and use information and services for health-related decisions for themselves and others.”

There are several consumer health resources under Health & Medicine in GoWYLD.net.

For example, Medline Plus is a resource from the National Library of Medicine. It provides health and wellness information on health topics, medications and dietary supplements, human genetics (consumer-friendly information about the effects of genetic variation on human health), and medical tests ( including what the tests are used for, why a doctor may order a test, how a test will feel, and what the results may mean). There are videos on anatomy and body systems and animated videos that explain topics in health and medicine. It also includes Health Check Tools and interactive health games.

Included is “easy to read” information, in 60 languages, making it easier to read, understand, and use.

There are sources from more than 1,600 selected organizations, and Medline Plus provides 40,000 links to authoritative health information in English and 18,000 links to information in Spanish.

Two video tutorials, Understanding Medical Words and Evaluating Health Information, give users another way to understand and use health information.

Medline Plus is available to all Wyoming library users and does not require a library card to access. Other Health & Medicine resources may require your Wyoming library card number and PIN to use remotely.

For more information about these resources, visit your local library or contact Chris Van Burgh, Database Instruction Librarian at the Wyoming State Library, chris.vanburgh@wyo.gov.

Welcome Tumblebooks and TeenBookCloud to GoWYLD!



GoWYLD.net has two exciting new resources for educators, parents, and public librarians — Tumblebooks and TeenBookCloud.

Tumblebook Library contains curated collections of e-books and audiobooks in multiple formats include animated, talking picture books, read-along chapter books, National Geographic videos, non-fiction books, playlists, graphic novels, and more. This content is available for streaming only and is not downloadable.

TeenBookCloud is an online database of e-books and educator resources perfect for your middle school, high school, or public library. They offer a robust selection of graphic novels, enhanced novels, e-books, classic literature, National Geographic videos, educator resources, and audiobooks.

Go to GoWYLD.net and search by title, or find both in our Digital Library. The Wyoming State Library purchased Tumblebooks and TeenBookCloud with American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funds from the Institute of Museum and Library Services. These two resources will be made available to Wyoming residents through September 30, 2022.

100 Years Ago in Wyoming Newspapers



Newspaper headline reads: "WOMAN'S BRAVERY TOO MUCH FOR THUG WHO BROKE INTO IVINSON HALL LAST NITE"

On October 13, 1921, The Daily Boomerang in Laramie reported that a brave and quick-thinking woman in a University of Wyoming dormitory saved the day.

C.W. Allison broke into Ivinson hall and first threatened matron Laura J. Wurts with a gun and then hit her over the head with it. Stunned but still conscious, she kicked the intruder twice in the stomach. When he fled, she followed him screaming to attract attention, and he was caught.

Read the entire story and find more like it in the Wyoming Digital Newspaper Collection, part of the Digital Collection Suite of state historical resources.

Resources for National Reading Group Month



Cartoon style image of young man and woman reading while sitting on stack of big books. October is National Reading Group Month, an initiative of the Women’s National Book Association for “Sharing the joy of shared reading.”

You can find book club resources, book talks and book discussion guides in Novelist Plus, a reader’s advisory resource available in GoWYLD.net.

The book club resources, found under Quick Links on the top navigation bar, include a variety of book club articles. Titles range from, “So You Want to Lead a Book Discussion,” “Not Your Father’s Westerns,” and “True Crime for Your Book Club.” There are also 159 book discussion guides covering a variety of genres. These guides include a summary for discussion leaders (or to help readers decide if it’s the right book for them), read-alikes, and discussion starters.

There’s more information for book clubs by going to the Especially For tab at the top, and selecting Reader’s Advisory. Scroll down to book clubs to find links to Tips for Starting a Book Group, Book Group Innovators, and But My Book Club Doesn’t Read (historical fiction, romance, horror, etc.).

You can also find books from the home page. Search by title, location, plot, character, or use the Recommended Reading Lists. Novelist provides descriptions, reviews, including a link to Goodreads, and two ways to get to other books: Read-Alikes and Search for More. You can even browse “I’m in the mood for books that are…” These themes include “Fast paced and plot driven,” and “Creepy and suspenseful,”

Find Novelist Plus by going to GoWYLD.net and selecting from the Browse Databases By Title or under the Recommended Reading subject area.

Novelist Plus is available in Wyoming libraries and remotely with your Wyoming library card number and PIN. For more information, contact your local library or Chris Van Burgh, Database Instruction Librarian at the Wyoming State Library, chris.vanburgh@wyo.gov.

Want to hear more? Chris will be doing a program at the Wyoming Library Association conference, “GoWYLD.net For Book Clubs.” The program will cover Novelist Plus and Culturegrams and the ways they can help library staff and patrons with their book groups, book discussions, and book talks.

Celebrating the Joy of Fat Bears with GoWYLD Resources



Large grizzly bear standing in rushing stream.
747, the Fat Bear Week Champion of 2020. (Click on image to make him even BIGGER.) Photo from Katmai National Park & Preserve at www.nps.gov/katm/learn/fat-bear-week.htm.

Choose the fattest bear of the year! Katmai National Park’s Fat Bear Week is coming up. Voting will take place September 29-October 5, with the winner to be crowned on Fat Bear Tuesday, the first Tuesday in October. (Fat Bear Jr. voting is September 23-24.) Explore the Hall of Champions to see those grizzlies chosen as the heftiest chunks from prior years.

Some of the largest brown bears on Earth make their home at Brooks River in Katmai National Park, Alaska. Fat Bear Week is an annual tournament celebrating their success in preparation for winter hibernation.

Want to see and find out more? Go to GoWYLD.net and check out the bears in Britannica Library or Britannica School in Animal Kingdom, under Children/Elementary.

In Animal Kingdom you can read all about mammals, as well as amphibians and reptiles, birds, mollusks, fish and other sea animals, insects and other arthropods, and extinct animals.

Each animal page includes an introduction, where they live, physical features, behaviors, and reproduction. We were surprised to learn that these “large, powerful mammals are related to dogs and raccoons.” There are also pictures and a short video from Britannica’s incredible Images and Video collection.

You can change the reading level by selecting reading level 2 (Young Adults/Middle). This will include more information about specific bears, and more images and videos.

From Britannica: The Kodiak bear (Ursus arctos middendorffi), a subspecies of brown bear that lives in Alaska, is the largest. It weighs up to 1,720 pounds (780 kilograms) and can be almost 10 feet (3 meters) long. Polar bears can be just as heavy but are somewhat shorter.

Britannica Library and Britannica School are available in Wyoming libraries and remotely with a Wyoming library card number and pin through GoWYLD.net. Use the Browse Databases by Title link to access sthem.

For more information, check with your local library or contact Chris Van Burgh, Database Instruction Librarian at the Wyoming State Library, chris.vanburgh@wyo.gov.

Gale Books and Authors Features Hispanic Heritage Month



Text reads "Books in Honor of Hispanic Heritage Month (September 2021) with four book covers shown

Check out Gale Books and Authors in GoWYLD.net for book titles featured for National Hispanic Heritage Month, celebrated September 15 to October 15.

Featured novels include I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter, The Poet X, and How the Garcia Daughters Lost their Accents. This fiction and nonfiction reader’s advisory tool provides a description and details about the book such as setting, time period, subjects, and main characters. It also links to read-a-likes.

Books and Authors is available in Wyoming libraries and remotely with your Wyoming library card number and PIN. For more information, contact your local library or Chris Van Burgh, Database Instruction Librarian at the Wyoming State Library, chris.vanburgh@wyo.gov.

Find Titles in GoWYLD for Read an eBook Day



a young caucasian man, at home, searches an ebook to lend on an online library with his smartphone, with a simulated search engine in its screenSeptember 18 is Read an eBook Day! Check out Overdrive Virtual Library for thousands of titles to download, stream or send to your Kindle. The award-winning Libby app makes it easy to manage your holds and checkouts.

In addition, you can find eBooks in a few of our GoWYLD.net resources that are available for streaming.

For example, in BookFlix, a resource for the PreK-3 age group, you will find video storybooks paired with related nonfiction eBooks. Titles include Johnny Appleseed (just in time for Johnny Appleseed day on September 26) and Looking Through a Telescope, Peruse a book about Pluto or a dairy farm, and explore many more. To share the book one-on-one or with a group, there is an option to turn Read Along on or off.

In National Geographic Virtual Library use Explore Topics (travel, for example) and check out the eBooks. Find titles such as Novel Destinations: A Travel Guide to Literary Landmarks, and National Geographic Traveler: Great Britain. Or do a search for bird guides and narrow it down with the filter on the left. Titles include Field Guide to Birds of North America or Backyard Birds.

These are available in Wyoming libraries and remotely with a Wyoming library card number and PIN through GoWYLD.net. For more information, check with your local library or contact Chris Van Burgh, Database Instruction Librarian at the Wyoming State Library, chris.vanburgh@wyo.gov.

Fashion Finds for National Hat Day in GoWYLD



Title "Le Collezioni di Roma". Magazine image of woman in felt hat and patterned matching long jacket and trousers.
One of the many fashion finds in Proquest’s Vogue Italia Archive.

September 15 is National Felt Hat Day! Check out the evolution of the felt hat over time in the archive of Vogue magazine (U.S. edition). Find a full color page image format, from the first issue in 1892 to the present, with monthly updates for new issues.

Vogue Archive is part of ProQuest within the GoWYLD.net resources. Select ProQuest from the Browse Database by Title. On the main page, select Databases from the navigation bar at the top. Scroll down to select The Vogue Archive.

A search for felt hat will result in sketches and photos from 1892 to the present. From 1898, when “Felt is now raised to the highest pinnacle of millinery smartness for day wear, forenoon especially,” to the return of the “pale felt hat” in 1940 with the suggested way to wear your felt hat — if you are young, pushed back and if you are older, pushed slightly forward.

We also have access to The Vogue Italia Archive. Launched in 1964, it is recognized as the least commercial and most artistic edition, with a tradition of innovation and bold treatment of current issues & events) Search: cappello di feltro.

ProQuest is available through GoWYLD.net in all Wyoming libraries and remotely with a Wyoming library card and PIN. For more information contact your local library or Chris Van Burgh, Database Instruction Librarian at the Wyoming State Library, chris.vanburgh@wyo.gov.

Frankenstein Comes to Life in GoWYLD



Today is Frankenstein Day honoring the birthday of Mary Shelley, author and creator of Frankenstein. Rather than highlight Literature Online or Biography In Context, we thought we’d see if we could find the monster in Rolling Stone Archive.

Rolling Stone Archive is part of ProQuest within the GoWYLD.net resources. Select ProQuest from the Browse Database by Title. On the main page, select Databases from the navigation bar at the top. Scroll down to select this resource that goes from 2018 back to 1967.

Advertisement with several movie promotion posters.
Ads for movie posters. In 1971, a full-color reproduction of Boris Karloff’s 1931 Frankenstein was $1.49.

Rolling Stone includes reviews of music, film and books, interviews, and commentary on music and popular culture.

Find a review of Andy Warhol’s Frankenstein or the gold single “Frankenstein” from the album They Only Come Out at Night, by The Edgar Winter Group in 1974. Explore more for the 1994 review of R.E.M.’s Monster, or an interview with Stephen King in 2014.

Rolling Stone Archive is available in Proquest, a GoWYLD.net database. This resource and much more from GoWYLD are available in Wyoming libraries and remotely using your Wyoming library card number and PIN. For more information, contact your library or Chris Van Burgh, Database Instruction Librarian at the Wyoming State Library, chris.vanburgh@wyo.gov.

Reunions: Brought to You by Library Databases and a Kind Heart



Reposted from Natrona County Library
By Megan Bratton

As librarians, we come across a lot of strange things that patrons leave behind when they are returning books or visiting the Library – both between the pages and on the shelves. Everything from grocery receipts and airline boarding passes to moldy food and computer dongles. The vast majority of the time, we toss these in the trash or the lost and found without another thought (except for the time we found all the live roaches in a returned CD case… there was a fair amount of screaming that happened before we trashed those creepy-crawlies).

Every now and then, though, we come across something that was accidentally left behind in a book or on a shelf that we know the owner would like to have back. We’ll do our best to reunite the item with its owner, but it’s not always an easy task. Recently, one of our Teen Librarians came across a valuable item left behind while she was shelving books; and it took a little bit of ingenuity, a dash of research, and a load of determination and stick-to-itiveness to figure out how to get the item back to where it belonged.

It was just a normal morning in the Teen Zone. Librarian Chelsie was taking advantage of the quiet before we open to straighten shelves and get ready for the day. It was while she was straightening that she found a card on one of the shelves. When she opened it, a picture of a young boy fell out. Upon closer inspection, Chelsie realized it was a funeral program for a young man who had passed away in his late twenties. The funeral program was not new, either – it was from 2001, making it 20 years old! Having lasted that long, this item was clearly very important to someone.

I don’t know if it fell out of a book or someone’s bag, but I knew that I had to try and return it to one of the young man’s relatives. I couldn’t just put it in our lost and found, this was too special. He was loved and someone was missing him.

–Chelsie

Chelsie’s quest to return the item to the person who had inadvertently left it at the Library started by Googling names listed on the program. This didn’t provide many answers, so she tried looking for his obituary using Google, but with no luck.

That’s when Chelsie put her Library resources and research skills to use. She went onto our Ancestry.com and Wyoming Newspapers online databases to search for more information. Bingo! She was able to find his obituary, along with names of surviving family members.

“It was clear how much he loved his family,” said Chelsie. She found one of his daughters on social media and sent her a message. The daughter responded quickly with her mailing address, and Chelsie was able to mail the program and picture to her, getting it back into the hands of the young man’s loved ones.

And in the end? Chelsie says she felt like Nancy Drew! Librarians… your neighborhood detectives, at your service.