Category Archives: National Library News

ALSC Releases 2017 Summer Reading Lists

The Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC) has released its 2017 Summer Reading Lists. With titles organized into four age ranges, young booklovers are sure to find some great reads to beat the heat. Each list is available to download for free; birth-preschool, K-2nd grade, 3rd – 5th grade, and 6th– 8th grade.

The four 2017 Summer Reading brochures can be customized to include library information. Libraries are encouraged to include contact information, summer hours and details about summer reading and learning programs for children on each brochure before making copies available to patrons, students and neighborhood partners.

Titles on the 2017 Summer Reading List were compiled and annotated by ALSC’s Quicklists Consulting Committee.

Few First-Year Students Prepared for College-Level Research

Reposted with permission from Library Research Service

In January & February of 2017, Library Journal surveyed college and university libraries about their services for first-year students. The survey was sent to 12,000 academic libraries. In total, 543 schools participated: 399 four-year schools, and 144 two-year schools. The results were initially shared at the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) 2017 conference.

Respondents reported that, in their opinion, only 28% of first-year students are prepared for college-level research. Four-year and two-year academic librarians agreed that evaluating resources for reliability is a major challenge for first-year students.

The majority of participating libraries (97%) reported that they offer information literacy instruction for first-year students. Most of the time information literacy instruction is optional. It was mandated at 22% of four-year institutions and 7% of two-year schools. Librarians embedded within courses is more rare, with 35% of four-year schools and 23% of two-year schools offering that option. While information literacy instruction is offered widely, only 23% of respondents have a specific information literacy or first-year experience librarian.  When asked about the ACRL Information Literacy Framework, Respondents most frequently used the “Research as Inquiry” and “Searching as Strategic Exploration” areas in their instruction, and least frequently used “Information Creation as a Process.”

Most respondents’ schools (90%) measure first-year student success. This takes a variety of forms, for example student retention rates, student satisfaction, and GPA. Not all academic libraries, however, have attempted to correlate information literacy or library experiences for first-year students with indicators of student success.  While the importance of information literacy is clear to librarians, what types of data could show a quantifiable connection between student success and information literacy?  Separately from the Library Journal study, librarians at the University of Minnesota have been researching this connection. Check out their studies for more information.

Note: This post is part of the Library Research Service’s series, “The LRS Number.” In this series, they highlight statistics that help tell the story of the 21st-century library.

2017 Teens’ Top Ten Nominees Announced

The Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA), a division of the American Library Association, has officially announced the 2017 Teens Top Ten Nominees. This year’s list of nominees features 26 titles that were published between Jan. 1, 2016 and Dec. 31, 2016:

  • Black, Jenna. Nightstruck. Tor Teen.
  • Bosworth, Jennifer. The Killing Jar. Farrar, Strauss, & Giroux.
  • Bracken, Alexandra. Passenger. Disney-Hyperion.
  • Braswell, Liz. Once Upon a Dream. Disney Press.
  • Buxbaum, Julie. Tell Me Three Things. Random House.
  • Clare, Cassandra. Lady Midnight. Margaret K. McElderry.
  • Dennard, Susan. Truthwitch. Tor Teen.
  • Dinan, Kurt. Don’t Get Caught. Sourcebooks Fire.
  • Federle, Tim. The Great American Whatever. Simon & Schuster.
  • Freedman, Russell. We Will Not Be Silent. Clarion Books.
  • Glasgow, Kathleen. Girl in Pieces. Delacorte Press.
  • Gout, Leopoldo. Genius: The Game. Feiwel & Friends.
  • Hamilton, Alwyn. Rebel of the Sands. Viking Books.
  • Kincaid, S. J. The Diabolic. Simon & Schuster.
  • Landers, Melissa. Starflight. Disney-Hyperion.
  • Martin, Emily. The Year We Fell Apart. Simon & Schuster.
  • McIntosh, Will. Burning Midnight. Random House.
  • Meyer, Marissa. Heartless. Feiwel & Friends.
  • Mills, Wendy. All We Have Left. Bloomsbury.
  • Nijkamp, Marieke. This is Where It Ends. Sourcebooks Fire.
  • Russo, Meredith. If I Was Your Girl. Flatiron Books.
  • Shusterman, Neal. Scythe. Simon & Schuster.
  • Welch, Jenna Evans. Love & Gelato. Simon & Schuster.
  • West, Kasie. P.S. I Like You. Scholastic.
  • Williamson, Lisa. The Art of Being Normal. Farrar, Strauss, & Giroux.
  • Yoon, Nicola. The Sun is Also a Star. Delacorte Press.

YALSA is calling on libraries to encourage teens to read the nominees throughout the summer so they are ready for the national Teens’ Top Ten vote, which will take place August 15 through Teen Read Week (October 8-14). The ten nominees that receive the most votes will be named the official 2017 Teens’ Top Ten. Learn more and access a free Teens’ Top Ten Toolkit.

YALSA will award 50 sets of the nominated books through its 2017 Teens’ Top Ten Book Giveaway, funded by the Dollar General Literacy Foundation. Application deadline is May 1, 2017.

The Teens’ Top Ten is a “teen choice” list, where teens nominate and choose their favorite books of the previous year. Nominators are members of teen book groups in sixteen school and public libraries around the country.

Announcing the NMC Horizon Report: 2017 Library Edition

From the New Media Consortium

What is on the five-year horizon for academic and research libraries? Which trends and technology developments will drive transformation? What are the critical challenges and how can we strategize solutions?

These questions regarding technology adoption and educational change steered the discussions of 77 experts to produce the NMC Horizon Report: 2017 Library Edition.

Six key trends, six significant challenges, and six developments in technology profiled in this report are poised to impact library strategies, operations, and services with regards to learning, creative inquiry, research, and information management. The three sections of this report constitute a reference and technology planning guide for librarians, library leaders, library staff, policymakers, and technologists.

The NMC Horizon Report: 2017 Library Edition is published under a Creative Commons license to facilitate its widespread use, easy duplication, and broad distribution. The New Media Consortium (NMC), University of Applied Sciences (HTW) Chur, Technische Informationsbibliothek (TIB), ETH Library, and the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) jointly released the report at the ACRL 2017 Conference.

ALA Releases State of America’s Libraries Report

From the American Library Association

Today the American Library Association (ALA) released the State of America’s Libraries 2017, an annual report that captures usage trends within all types of libraries. The report finds that library workers’ expertise continues to play a key role in the transformation of communities through access to services that empower users to navigate our ever-changing digital, social, economic, and political society.

Librarians provide users with expertise and the training needed to evaluate the quality of information in all formats. With the massive increase in the amount of digital content, libraries are ramping up efforts to make sure that children and teens are well-equipped to evaluate the sources, content and intended message of all types of media.

Libraries of all types play a vital role in supporting early childhood literacy, computer training and workforce development. In addition, they provide a safe place for everyone, reflecting and serving the diversity of their communities in their collections, programs, and services. Libraries continue to face challenges of censorship to books and resources.

Other 2017 State of America’s Libraries report findings include:

  • Academic librarians are embracing new responsibilities in such areas as scholarly communication, digital archives, data curation, digital humanities, visualization, and born-digital objects. Other emerging areas include bibliometrics and altmetrics, e-learning, custom information solutions, and research data management.
  • Public libraries nationwide are taking action, using signs and social media to proclaim “everyone is welcome;” creating reading lists on demographics, voting, social justice, and other hot topics; partnering with community organizations to combat Islamophobia and racism and to connect with disenfranchised populations; and developing programs to help community members spot “fake news” and evaluate information online.
  • There is some evidence that school library budgets may be increasing, after five years of reductions, and there is hope that the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) will be used in support of school libraries. The law includes language that allows schools to budget funds for school libraries and acknowledges school librarians as specialized instructional support personnel.

Read the full report for more library trends of the past year.

Top Ten Challenged Books of 2016

The American Library Association Office for Intellectual Freedom (OIF) has just announced its annual list of the Top Ten Most Challenged Books, using information from public challenges reported in the media, as well as censorship reports submitted to the office through its challenge reporting form.

Out of 323 challenges reported to the ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom, the Top Ten Most Challenged Books of 2016 are

    1. This One Summer written by Mariko Tamaki and illustrated by Jillian Tamaki
    2. Drama written and illustrated by Raina Telgemeier
    3. George written by Alex Gino
    4. I Am Jazz written by Jessica Herthel and Jazz Jennings, and illustrated by Shelagh McNicholas
    5. Two Boys Kissing written by David Levithan
    6. Looking for Alaska written by John Green
    7. Big Hard Sex Criminals written by Matt Fraction and illustrated by Chip Zdarsky
    8. Make Something Up: Stories You Can’t Unread written by Chuck Palahniuk
    9. Little Bill (series) written by Bill Cosby and illustrated by Varnette P. Honeywood
    10. Eleanor & Park written by Rainbow Rowell

For an in-depth look at censorship trends, check out the newly released State of America’s Libraries Report.