Monthly Archives: November 2017

YALSA Releases Teen Services Competencies

From the Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA)

YALSA’s Teen Services Competencies for Library Staff, which replaces Competencies for Librarians Serving Youth, is the latest resource developed to help graduate schools, library administrators, and library staff guarantee that all teens receive high quality service from their public and school libraries, regardless of whether the library has the capacity to dedicate a full-time position to serving teens. It is intended to set a foundation for the education and professional development of all library staff, regardless of job title, and to provide guidance for determining practitioner skills and knowledge. It is also meant to provide a framework to enable those within and outside the field to understand the unique role library staff can play in helping teens prepare for college, careers and life, and to communicate that role to others.

The 10 competencies are listed below.  Download the complete document for free.

  1. Teen Growth and Development
  2. Interactions with Teens
  3. Learning Environments (formal & informal)
  4. Learning Experiences (formal & informal)
  5. Youth Engagement and Leadership
  6. Community and Family Engagement
  7. Cultural Competency and Responsiveness
  8. Equity of Access
  9. Outcomes and Assessment
  10. Continuous Learning

There’s a Wyoming Archivist for That!

Originally published on the ArchivesAWARE! blog of the Society of American Archivists An interview by Rachel Seale, Outreach Archivist at Iowa State University with Anne L. Foster, Archivist at Yellowstone National Park. Reposted with permission.

Anne L. Foster

Anne L. Foster has served as Yellowstone National Park’s Archivist since 2010. Prior to that, she was the University Archivist at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, Traveling Archivist for the Montana Historical Society, NHPRC Fellow in Archival Administration at Fort Lewis College in Colorado, and Assistant Archivist at the Sharlot Hall Museum in Arizona. She is a Certified Archivist (CA), Digital Archives Specialist (DAS), and holds an Masters in Library Science (MLS) from the University of Maryland.

RS: How did you get your gig?

AF: As an undergraduate history student at nearby Montana State University in my hometown of Bozeman, Montana, I used to see flyers advertising an internship in the archives at Yellowstone. While I couldn’t take advantage of the program at the time (I was working three other jobs to pay for school), the fact that archives was a potential career for a history major and that someplace I loved like Yellowstone had one stuck with me. For the next fifteen years, through graduate school and several other archives jobs, I would periodically check and see Yellowstone was hiring. And then, on one random check—they were! I’d just been tenured and promoted at my academic repository, but finally, my dream job was available. All those other jobs were probably a good thing, though, because they gave the skill set needed to step in as the first professional archivist in Yellowstone and tackle one of the largest backlogs in the National Park Service.

RS: Tell us about your organization.

AF: The Archives is part of Yellowstone’s Heritage & Research Center (HRC), which also houses the Park’s museum collection, herbarium, and research library. The HRC is part of the Yellowstone Center for Resources, which is tasked with managing all those things that make Yellowstone so special like the thermal features, wolves and bears, and the scientific research that guides management decisions. While we are part of the National Park Service, we are very fortunate to also have Yellowstone Forever, our philanthropic and educational partner. Yellowstone Forever actually started life in the 1930s as the Yellowstone Museum and Library Association, so our collections have long been a key part of their efforts. Most people think of Yellowstone as the place for geysers and wildlife—and we are–but the Archives is the place where we document those special features and our efforts to preserve them, which to me is something special.

RS: Describe your collections.

AF: Like many archives in the U.S., we are both an institutional repository and a collecting institution. Our institutional records are government records and we are subject to federal records laws and guidelines. There are actually two types of records within the government collection: resource management records and administrative/historical records. All national parks keep resource management records. Parks are created to manage a resource or resources and as long as that resource exists, we need to keep records pertaining to those resources to help inform future management decisions (these records are considered “permanently active” as long as the resource is active). Unlike other national parks, however, we also retain our permanent administrative and historical records like Superintendent’s correspondence, planning documents, partnership agreements and other records that don’t pertain quite so directly to resources. For other parks, those records are sent to the National Archives. Yellowstone is fortunate to be one of the few Affiliated Archives of the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). This means that the records become part of NARA’s collection, but so long as we meet their standards for preservation, security, and access, we can keep them in our location. This makes it easier for our researchers, both staff and the public, to access our history in one place.

Our third category of collection is our donated or manuscript collections. These materials range from Park visitors’ photo albums, diaries, and scrapbooks through the research of scholars and scientists who donate their data for future comparative or longevity studies to records of businesses who have operated in the Park over its nearly 150 years. In fact, our Yellowstone Park Company (YPC) records, the main Park concessioner for the first 100 years, is our most accessed collection because it includes payroll records. The YPC hired hundreds of college kids every summer and, apparently, that summer was so memorable that the employees would spend the rest of their lives talking about their summer in Yellowstone. Now, we’re getting those employees’ kids and grandkids coming in to find out what Grandma or Grandpa really did in Yellowstone.

RS: What are some challenges unique to your collections?

AF: People love Yellowstone, so much so that there isn’t much about the Park that they aren’t interested in. This makes archival appraisal a bit challenging—the most routine things truly have the potential for historical value. Our NARA-approved NPS records schedule, for example, classifies most supply records as temporary. Of course it does—why would one need records for equipment once that item is used up or sold? But, we get queries regularly from people who have purchased former Park vehicles (buses, boats, snowmobiles) and want to know all about their item, down to paint formulas and the names of Rangers who drove them; it’s frustrating not to be able to answer their questions. At the same time, we can’t possibly keep everything. So, it comes down to a rigorous and often detailed appraisal process.

We can have some unique preservation challenges as well. Some of our most interesting records are logbooks–bound books used to record eruption data, visitor comments, or deep thoughts about wilderness. But, many of the logbooks are kept in less than optimal locations during creation—backcountry cabins, rock cairns on top of mountains, or next to erupting geysers. By the time they are filled and transferred to the archives they can be nibbled, rained upon, or even somewhat eaten away by the acidity of geyser spray. During the 1988 fires, the Park’s historian actually flew with a fire crew in a helicopter to several backcountry cabins in order to rescue the logbooks (fortunately, all of the historic cabins were saved). Today, we have a more regular transfer of the logs to help cut down on damage and make use of digital duplication in cases where the damage is significant or potentially harmful to other items.

RS: What is the favorite part of your job?

AF: The location; it is magical to go to work in Wonderland and even more extraordinary to be the keeper of the documentary record for the world’s first national park. That feeling is shared by my coworkers as well as our visitors and researchers—it makes for a lot of enthusiasm and interest in the Park’s history. Every day is different and that makes for interesting and challenging work. There’s a huge amount of variety to my day: the types of records, the archival functions, and the research questions are as varied as Yellowstone’s landscape.

Thanksgiving Facts from the U.S. Census Bureau

Where do you plan to eat Thanksgiving dinner? According to the U.S. Census Bureau, you have 118.9 million possibilities — the number of occupied housing units across the nation in the second quarter of 2017. (Source: Housing Vacancies and Homeownership, Table 8.)

Some of those tables may be crowded. There were 4.6 million multigenerational households, consisting of three or more generations, in the United States in 2016. (2016 American Community Survey, Table B11017 .) It will take a lot of food to feed that many — good thing we raise 244 million turkeys in this country (2016 forecast from USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service.)

Four populated places are named after the day’s main course: Turkey Creek CDP, Arizona (2015 pop. 405), Turkey city, Texas (367); Turkey Creek village, Louisiana (357); and Turkey town, North Carolina (280). (2011-2015 American Community Survey.) Alas, none of them are in Wyoming, although Wyoming Places does list a Turkey Hollow as a land feature in Carbon County.

Find more Thanksgiving Day facts from the U.S. Census Bureau’s Facts for Features.

Our reference librarians can help you find statistics from the U.S. Census Bureau and other sources. Contact statelibrary@wyo.gov or (307) 777-6333 for assistance.

UW’s Rocky Mountain Herbarium Part of Major Digital Archive Project

Students and volunteers working on the grant are able to digitize and database plant specimens in the Rocky Mountain Herbarium’s new imaging laboratory.

From UW News

The University of Wyoming’s Rocky Mountain Herbarium is a leading partner in a $2.9 million award from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to create a comprehensive digital archive of more than 1.7 million plant specimens native to the southern Rocky Mountain region.

The University of Colorado-Boulder is the principal lead for the award, which includes 38 universities, botanical gardens, national parks and Native American nations.

The Rocky Mountain Herbarium, as the largest herbarium in the region, will contribute a significant number of specimens and will assist smaller institutions in their digitizing and imaging efforts.

Once it is completed, researchers and the public will be able to access the database for information about the region’s more than 4,000 plant species, from specimens collected from the 1800s to the present. The map-based application will allow visualization of species’ distributions and make available high-resolution images of plant specimens.

“Herbarium specimens are used more and more to document natural resources, elucidate evolutionary relationships and processes, describe the effects of climate change, and to identify organisms and landscapes of conservation concern,” says Rocky Mountain Herbarium curator Burrell “Ernie” Nelson. “Consolidating specimen data from these institutions will lead to more and better understanding of these topics in the southern Rocky Mountains, and may bring to light patterns that have been previously invisible.”

The Rocky Mountain Herbarium is already a leader in the region and among herbaria, in collection size, activity and its online database of digitized specimens. NSF support will make it possible to increase the rate of specimen digitization and imaging, and integrate an estimated 670,000 southern Rocky Mountain specimens into the new “Southern Rockies” portal.

As curator, Nelson will oversee specimen selection and imaging at the herbarium. Larry Schmidt, of the UW Libraries, is project manager for the digital processing and workflow. UW Libraries also is involved in the data management, file processing and preservation aspects of the project.

The southern Rocky Mountain region, as defined for this project, includes the mountains, basins and high plains of southern Wyoming, Colorado and northern New Mexico; the continuous high plains to the east of those states; and the Colorado Plateau in eastern Utah and northern Arizona.

School Library Paige

Just out! Catch the latest news and updates in the November 2017 School Library Paige, from the Wyoming State Library’s School Library Consultant, Paige Bredenkamp. Please take a minute to respond to the School Library Hotline; results will be posted in next month’s newsletter. Questions about school library issues? Contact Paige at paige.bredenkamp@wyo.gov or (307) 777-6331.

Upcoming WSL Webinar on New AASL Standards

Learn more about the newly released American Association of School Librarians (AASL) National School Library Standards. Paige Bredenkamp, School Library Consultant at the Wyoming State Library, and Jennisen Lucas, Wyoming’s AASL Affiliate and school librarian, will host a webinar discussion, “Talking About the New AASL Standards“on Tuesday, November 28, at 3:30 p.m. MST. Come with your questions and ideas!

Register here.

Questions about this webinar, or about other school library topics? Paige is on hand to help. Contact her at paige.bredenkamp@wyo.gov or (307) 777-6331.

WSL Closed for Thanksgiving

From the November 30, 1911 Lusk Herald, found in Wyoming Newspapers

The Wyoming State Library will be closed Thursday, November 23, for the Thanksgiving holiday. We will be open our normal hours on Friday, November 24.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, there are four populated places named after the holiday’s traditional main course: Turkey Creek CDP, Arizona (405 residents in 2015); Turkey city, Texas (367); Turkey Creek village, Louisiana (357); and Turkey town, North Carolina (280). Although the Equality State isn’t on the list with a turkey-themed town, Wyoming Places lists a Turkey Hollow (valley) in Carbon County, and the U.S. Board on Geographic Names lists three Turkey Creeks in Wyoming, among other locations. See more Thanksgiving Day trivia from the U.S. Census from their Facts for Features.

November 2017 Outrider Now Available

Find a wrap-up of the latest in Wyoming library news in the November 2017 Outrider newsletter from the Wyoming State Library. Subscribe today, and we’ll send the Outrider straight to your email inbox each month.

Have news you’d like included? Contact Susan Mark, WSL publications specialist, at susan.mark@wyo.gov or (307) 777-5915. Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook and Twitter, too.

Free Continuing Education Events for the Week of November 20

Free, online, continuing education events for this week from the Wyoming State Library Training Calendar. You can subscribe and view the events in your calendar software, or you can find all the events at library.wyo.gov/services/training/calendar.

Tuesday, Nov 21 (11-12:30 pm)
Accelerating Census Data in Excel: Basic Visualization and Analysis (U.S. Census Bureau)

During this course you will learn how to download census data access using the American FactFinder for formatting in Excel. You will also learn how to create basic data visualizations and how to conduct advanced analyses of census data.

For more information and to register, visit: https://www.census.gov/mso/www/training/

Assistive Technology Apps for iOS and Chrome

Assistive technology (AT) is any item, piece of equipment, software program, or product system that is used to increase, maintain, or improve the functional capabilities of persons with disabilities. Many apps fall under this category. Wyoming Assistive Technology Resources (WATR), a program of the Wyoming Institute for Disabilities at the University of Wyoming, has put together this helpful list of apps for both iOS and Chrome OS (Chromebook):

 Available for both iOS and Chrome OS
Ginger

  • Auto-corrects grammar, spelling errors
  • Suggests alternate text expressions
  • Dictionary, thesaurus, text-to-speech
Grammarly

  • Spelling and grammar checker
  • Corrects commonly confused words
  • Scans text for proper use of grammar
Pocket

  • Unlimited storage: keeps saved articles and videos in one place
  • Reads articles aloud
Photomath

  • Scans math problems for instant results
  • Includes camera caculator, handwriting recognition, and a smart calculator
Bookshare Web Reader

  • Online audio, digital, and BRF (Braille Ready Format) library for people with qualified print disabilities
  • Free for students with qualified print disabilities
Learning Ally Link

  • Online audio, digital, and BRF library for people with qualified print disabilities
BARD Mobile

  • Provides access to nearly 65,000 items from the NLS Braille and Audio Reading Download (BARD) site
Available for iOS
Prizmo

  • Scans, reads documents out loud
  • Can use without Internet connection
Voice Dream Reader

  • Reads documents using text-to-speech
  • Synchronizes with Bookshare, Evernote, Dropbox, and Google Drive
Claro PFD

  • Scans, reads documents out loud
  • Can fill in documents using microphone
  • Insert voice messages and pictures in documents
Available for Chrome OS
Google Text-to-Speech

  • Reads text on your screen out loud
Read & Write for Google Chrome

  • Spell checker, speech-to-text
  • Word prediction
  • Talking and picture dictionary
Google Keep

  • Organize your notes by adding labels
  • Add recurring reminders to never miss regular to-dos